October 20, 2014

Legendary

So how would Doc Halladay do in his first post-season start?

Would he be able to handle the pressure/anticipation of his first post-season start after 2,297 regular season innings?

Would he wear down after a 250 inning season?

Would his “struggles” late in the year bleed into the playoffs?

Does anyone have anymore questions about Roy Halladay, like, ever again?

Roy Halladay’s performance yesterday was a writer’s dream. In an age where the media wants to hype every player and every game as “the best ever?” – what do they do when they actually witness something that does belong in the analogs of history. What do they do when hyperbole is actually warranted? How do they distinguish a truly amazing performance from all the other great performances they have tried to hype up? I could sit here and try to eloquently describe yesterday as one would describe a symphony, but instead, I’ll just settle for the words I would try to fit in…

Masterful.

Powerful.

Calculated.

Surgical.

Silly.

Overwhelming.

Devastating.

Drowning.

Heavy.

But the one that came to mind for me first was…

Legendary.

Watching that game last night, I couldn’t help but think that this is what is must have been like to watch Walter Johnson on the mound. Or Bob Gibson. Or Satchel Paige. A man among boys. Someone who makes the game look unfair. Someone who looks like they are throwing a ball made of iron when the hitter make “contact.” I feel fortunate to be able to watch Halladay pitch at all, let alone for the team I’ve followed my entire life.

Needless to say, my reaction to all this was “I have to examine every pitch.”

So that’s what I did.

I compiled all the pitch data from the MLB.com “Gameday” feature, and here’s what I found…

Pitch Breakdown

Fastball – 35 thrown
Cutter – 31
Curveball – 22
Change-Up – 16

Result Breakdown

Ball – 25
Called Strike – 20
Out – 19
Foul – 18
Swinging Strike – 14
Swinging Strike Three – 5
Called Strike Three – 3

Strike %: 75.9%
Out %: 18.2%
Contact %: 66%

Velocity and Results by Pitch

Fastball (35 thrown)

Average Velocity: 92.7 mph

Ball – 9
Foul – 9
Called Strike – 8
Out – 7
Called Strike Three – 2

Strike %: 74.2%
Out %: 20%
Contact %: 100%

Cutter (31 thrown)

Average Velocity: 90.7 mph

Called Strike – 9
Foul – 7
Out – 6
Ball – 6
Swinging Strike – 2
Called Strike (Out) – 1

Strike %: 80.6%
Out %: 19.3%
Contact %: 86.6%

Curveball (22 thrown)

Average Velocity: 78.4 mph

Swinging Strike – 7
Ball – 5
Out – 4
Called Strike – 2
Swinging Strike Three – 2
Foul – 2

Strike %: 77.2%
Out %: 18.1%
Contact %: 53.3%

Change-Up (16 thrown)

Average Velocity: 85.3 mph

Swinging Strike – 5
Ball – 5
Swinging Strike Three – 3
Out – 2
Called Strike – 1

Strike %: 68.7%
Out %: 12.5%
Contact %: 20%

Some Quick Thoughts…

  • 20% contact rate on his change-up?? Wow – what a difference maker that pitch has been.
  • He throws his fastball and cutter to get outs on contact, and uses his curve and change when he needs an swing and miss. Must be nice to have 4 “go-to” pitches.
  • His fastball moves so much that on the Gameday feature, they had trouble distinguishing between his change-up and fastball, incorrectly marking it several times.
  • To me, the cutter is the pitch that sets him apart. He throws is harder than anyone is baseball except Mariano Rivera. Hitters think they are getting a fastball to hit (cause you aren’t hitting the soft stuff) and the best they can usually do is a soft grounder.

Well, that’s all I got for now. What a game. Hopefully the Phillies come out with a DVD with both this and the perfect game on it, so we’ll be able to watch them for years to come.

Finally – for those commenting on the “opulence” commercial….

“Dis one”…

If you liked this post...Help Spread the Word:
  • YardBarker
  • BallHype
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Mixx
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Comments

  1. JMC13 says:

    Legendary performance to say the least.  Wonderful breakdown of all of the pitches.  I don’t post much but, I really do appreciate reading everything you put on this site. 

  2. Stacy says:

    Legendary Hall of Fame pitcher Roy Halladay – yes, I like it very much.

  3. Pete says:

    JMC13 -

    Thanks – appreciate it.

    Stacy-

    I was pondering Halladay’s HOF credentials last night…

    2297.1 IP, 3.32 ERA, 169-86, 1.18 WHIP, 1,714 K’s, 1 (soon-to-be 2) Cy Youngs

    Here are the pitchers that have met or exceeded those numbers:

    Randy Johnson, Pedro Martinez, Greg Maddux, Roger Clemens, Don Sutton, Tom Seaver, Jim Palmer, Catfish Hunter, Juan Marichal, Jim Bunning, Don Drysdale, Sandy Koufax, Pete Alexander, Walter Johnson, Chief Bender, Eddie Plank, Ed Walsh, Christy Mathewson and Rube Waddell.

    All 19 are in, or will be in, the HOF.

    Now, just for fun, let’s say that Halladay has 3 more seasons like this last one and then retires.

    That would leave him with the following numbers:

    3,049.1 IP, 3.10 ERA, 232-116, 1.15 WHIP, 2,371 K

    The only pitchers in that group would be…

    Tom Seaver, Walter Johnson, Christy Mathewson

    I think if he retired tomorrow he’d have a good shot. And if he keeps it going through age 36 (I see no reason why he won’t), he’ll be a first ballot guy and in the best RHP ever discussion.

  4. tk76 says:

    “Roy Halladay Greatness Watch: Playoff Edition.”
     
    BTW, off the top of your head who are the 5 greatest pitchers and 5 greatest position players to have ever worn a Phillies uniform in the past 50 years?
     
    Not the greatest as a Phillie, but guys who at some point were regulars as Phillies (so Pedro counts.)
     
     

  5. tk76 says:

    Rose
    Schmidt
    ?
    ?
    ?
    —-
    Carlton
    Pedro
    Halladay
    ?
    ?

  6. Ryan says:

    Assuming he has 3 more seasons like this last one and then retires (let’s also assume that with 3 more seasons like this last one, he wins 1 more Cy Young and while were at it, let’s assume he wins a World Series), what team do you think would be depicted on his Hall of Fame plaque?

  7. tk76 says:

    Blue Jays.

  8. Pete says:

    Probably the Jays. But if he gets to 1,000+ innings with us, who knows.

    I still think Schilling, if he goes in, should go in as a DBack.

     

     

     

     

  9. tk76 says:

    Drafted, developed and spent 12 years and 313 appearances with Toronto.
     
    Can’t see how 130 games as a Phillie can supersede that.  His time as a Phillie should serve as validation, but he established his career as a Blue Jay.

  10. tk76 says:

    D-Back or D-Bag.  Either way, he was a fine pitcher.  One of the better late bloomers (along with his teammate that you don’t want to get in a snowball fight with.)
     
    Pass me the ketchup.

  11. Pete says:

    If Doc did something historical in Philly (4 straight Cys or something) he could go in as a Phillies. or if he re-signed as has many more years with us.

  12. tk76 says:

    The scary thing is that it could happen.  Especially if the Phillies offense heats up again in the next few years.
     
    If he is winning 22-25 games, with his stature, it would be tough to deny him.  even if his numbers tailed off a bit.Sort of payback for all of his years on the wrong side of the block in the AL East.
     
    But there will be tough competition.

  13. jkay says:

    looks like Texas may be taking the series. not surprising. it is a 5 game series after all.
     

  14. joof says:

    5 greatest pitchers/position players in the last 50 yrs:
     
    In the order I thought of them.
    1) Schmidt
    2) Carlton (never saw play)
    3) Rose    (never saw play)
    4) Shilling (Pedro Martinez would go here based on the original question)
    5) Halladay
    6) Utley
    7) Dykstra (Dale Murphy same reason)
    I’m going to have to fill this is out with players way before my time
    1) R. Roberts (mightve been 60 yrs)
    2) Ashburn
    3) Del Ennis
    4) Utley
     
    I didnt read the others posts so I may have missed a player or two. The earliest memories I have of the Phillies are the late 80′s.

  15. Ken Bland says:

    I still think Schilling, if he goes in, should go in as a DBack.>>

    wow, not as a Red Sox?

    Maybe you looked some stuff up, that’s just my gut reaction.
    Assuming he has 3 more seasons like this last one and then retires (let’s also assume that with 3 more seasons like this last one, he wins 1 more Cy Young and while were at it, let’s assume he wins a World Series), what team do you think would be depicted on his Hall of Fame plaque?>

    I wanna say it was Cito Gaston who I heard in an interview this summer that talked about Doc.  He predicted that Doc woulde pitch into his early 40s, citing his work ethic as the enabler.  If that develops, Doc has 8-9 years left.  Guesses on Doc’s Hall of Fame cap and the like based on that seem pretty premature.

    My only point is that I don’t consider it very realistic to think of Doc retiring in 3 years.

    Doc was at the Bank working out at 10 AM this morning.  Think that’s leadership?  That’s 10 Eastern time if you are scoring at home.  He turned down Letterman and the likes, citing his con’s birthday as first priority. 

    <<off the top of your head who are the 5 greatest pitchers and 5 greatest position players to have ever worn a Phillies uniform in the past 50 years?
    >>

    5 pitchetrs, Doc, Lefty, Petey Martin, Roy O and Jim Bunning.

    5 players – Pete, Mike, RyHo, Chase, Tony Perez, Joe Morgan.

  16. Ken Bland says:

    I think if he retired tomorrow he’d have a good shot. And if he keeps it going through age 36 (I see no reason why he won’t), he’ll be a first ballot guy and in the best RHP ever discussion.>>

    Well, I’m pursuing a ridiculous point because he’s not, but there would be precedent for that, Sandy, out at 30.

    But just as a point of consideration, and no need to denounce this list, I guess from season’s start, is from the BaseballReference.com Halladay page.  Only 1 Hall of Famer made the players comparable list.

    Guid

    Hudson

    Saberhagen

    CC

    Don Newcombe

    Dizzy Dean (HofF)

    Larry Corcharan

    Johan

    Eddie Lopat

    from that standpoint, if he called it a day after this year, maybe not.

    I will say thyat at a comparable age, Doc is not as odds on as Maddux was.  Continued embellishment of his numbers won’t hurt.

  17. Ken Bland says:

    When the Reds take the field Friday for Game 2 of the NLDS against the Philadelphia Phillies, they will have played 30 straight innings in Citizens Bank Park without scoring a run. Not one.
    During their previous visit to Philadelphia in July, they were shut out in their last two games of the four-game series and didn’t score in their last three innings of the second game. And then, of course, they not only didn’t score a run in Game One of the NLDS Wednesday, they didn’t get a hit.

    Hall of Famer Hal McCoy, Dayton Daily News

  18. Ken Bland says:

    Here’s a pleasabnt surprise.  Sears nasmed Chase it’s 5 Tool Player of the Year.  Pretty cool accomplishment for one of his less productive seasons..

    http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20101007&content_id=15471484&vkey=news_phi&c_id=phi&partnerId=rss_phi

  19. tk76 says:

    Was Chase more toolsy than Werth this year?

  20. Phil D says:

    is anybody else like me and rooting for the yankees to win because of the possible re-match?

  21. Phil D says:

    does anybody have any thoughts on orlando cabrera’s comments?

  22. djmarco says:

    Yeah, I’m sorta rooting 4 them; we’ve won 2 WS in the last 30 years, but a series win over the Yankees would make the 3rd the sweetest

  23. djmarco says:

    I think that Cabrera’s comments were just his; the rest of the team didn’t mention anything according to some Reds writers on Twitter.  Also. at least one writer wrote that he thought that the home plate ump was very fair

  24. b.ski says:

    Baseball-reference has their list of the ten best pitching Game Scores in post-season history.  Halladay comes in at #4.

    When looking at lists of pitching Game Scores you find that, since basically all of these games are very low-hit, low-walk games and as such are all pretty comparable, strikeouts are what pushes a guy closer to the top of the list.  I know that I’m probably the only one that cares about this but I wonder if there couldn’t be something else taken into account besides strikeouts, namely efficiency, that can also be rewarded with points to raise a Game Score.

    I got thinking about how Greg Maddux would routinely throw complete games on very few pitches.  I did a quick search and found 4 games that stick out:

    7/2/97 @ Yankees…CG shutout, 3 hits, 8K, 28 batters faced, 84 pitches (game score 89)
    8/6/98 vs. Reds…CG shutout, 3 hits, 6K, 29 batters faced, 92 pitches, (game score 87)
    9/7/00 vs Dbacks…CG shutout, 4 hits, 6K, 32 batters faced, 89 pitches, (game score 85)
    9/13/00 vs Marlins…CG shutout, 4 hits, 4K, 29 batters faced, 89 pitches, (game score 83)

    ——back-to-back 4 hit shutouts on 89 pitches…pretty impressive——

    I will admit that, were he able to turn a few of those hits into strikeouts, Maddux would have ended up with a more dominant start in each case.  Leaving the hits aside though, would throwing more pitches and striking out a few more hitters turn any one of those CG shutouts into a more dominant outing than he already turned in?  I mean, facing only 28 batters and retiring 27 on 84 pitches seems pretty dominant to me.  It’s just that instead of it being an overpowering, blow-you-away dominance, it is a masterful, carve-you-up-with-surgical-precision dominance.  It’s also something I see as equally worthy of being rewarded.  How do you go about doing it?  Maybe by awarding 1 point for every 10 pitches you are below a certain threshhold, say 110 pitches for example.

    Anybody else agree with me that efficiency like that should count in measuring how good a start is?

  25. jjg says:

    I agree with you, bski.  Smart stuff. 

  26. jjg says:

    Can’t put a finger on it, but there’s something about Halladay’s ‘greatness’ I’m not buying.

  27. Ken Bland says:

    Anybody else agree with me that efficiency like that should count in measuring how good a start is?>>

    I can’t answer that.  But I might be inclined tio think its some degree of overanalysis.

    But I can tell you this.  Maddux had a reputation for setting up guys for future at bats.  He’d tease a guy with a gimme pitch one at bat, and turn around and have him set up for destruction anywhere from the next at bat to later that summer.  If that wasn’t part of his repetoire, his mumbers listed in the post would have even been sicker.  Charlie described Doc last night as Maddux with power.  Verducci threw Koufax into the equation today.  Maybe the only guy that looked less like a pitcher than the Mad Dog is this guy throwing tonight. I can’t help but wonder if all this Doc love today isn’t firing up TL. 

  28. jkay says:

    b.ski: i agree with you about efficiency. though I’m not sure pitch count is even viable as a factor when judging that. results, that’s what matters. different pitchers have different styles. a Justin Verlander (power and strikeouts) vs. a Chris Young (finesse and placement) will give you very different results in that category.
    it’s not like every pitcher is given a finite number of pitches he can throw.
    hey if you can throw 200, throw 200, if your arm’s that strong. if it is that strong, does that make you better or worse than the guy who did the same with 105.
    it would be an unfair measure and favor a certain type of pitcher.
     

  29. Ken Bland says:

    Baseball-reference has their list of the ten best pitching Game Scores in post-season history.  Halladay comes in at #4.>>

    And probably outdated after 24 hours.  The Freak is back in Cy Young form.  Route going 2 hitter with 13 (14?) ks.  Brilliant. 

  30. jkay says:

    Timmy may have gotten that memo. cruised through 6 innings and then proceeded to dismantle the Braves in the final 3.
     
    boy, if the Phils match up with San Fran in the LCS, game 1 is going to be something else.

  31. b.ski says:

    it would be an unfair measure and favor a certain type of pitcher.
     
     
    That is exactly why I brought up the subject of efficiency as an equal measure of dominance in the first place, jkay.  Because the way a Game Score is calculated now does favor a certain type of pitcher…a strikeout pitcher, and unfairly (to me) penalizes (or does not recognize) other types of pitchers.
     
     
     
    results, that’s what matters. different pitchers have different styles.
     
     
     
    Again, exactly the point I was trying to make.  Results are all that matters.  The goal is to record 27 outs and there is more than one way to do that, so why award more credit for the same results for doing it one way over another?  I understand that strikeouts are singled out because they are more or less under the direct control of the pitcher.  What I am saying is that having the command and control to consistently prevent hitters from making solid contact and retiring hitters quickly is also more or less under the direct control of the pitcher as well (at least the really good ones, on whose behalf I am making this argument).
     
     
    I mean, is a game in which a pitcher throws a 1-hit shutout by dispatching hitters with only one or two pitches apiece and recording 27 outs on pop-ups and weak ground balls any less dominant because he didn’t strike anybody out?  Yes striking out the side is dominant, but so is recording 3 outs on 5 pitches, IMO.
     
     
    I don’t know if pitch count is the best way to give a pitcher credit for efficiency, but I do think he deserves some sort of credit for being efficient.

  32. Ken Bland says:

    Yes striking out the side is dominant, but so is recording 3 outs on 5 pitches, IMO.>>

    I don’t want to discourage tyou one bit from pursuit of this discussion abnd thought process,I’m just going to offer my way of looking at it, which is kind of like my reaction for many years to the water coioler rhetoric of who is/was better, Mays, Aaron or Clemente.  Who cares?  I’d take any of them in a heartbeat.

    But as to what I copied above, even if 3 outs on 5 pitches is dominant, was it done in Game 6 a la Larsen, or in the 10th inning of Game 7 a la Jack Morris.  Conlin wrote of a gem Lefty pitched against the Giants this morning.  Before 6000 people.  Maybe he shouild ghet extra credit because Doc did it before a motivating crowd. Was it done against the 27 Yanks, or the 88 Dodgers, or 2010 Braves for that matter?  Was it done at night, or in a 5 o clock start in SoCal with the shadows having a dramatic effect on the early innings?

    I just don’t know how you can qualify that seperation between greratnesses.  I will say that the power versus stuff driven great performance is maybe more captivating, but to those that appreciate good pitching, either is brilliant.  One fun aspect about watching any well pitched game is the mixing of pitches, in location and type, but Mariano throws 1 pitch, and that’s as fun to watch.  To me, one is as good as the other.  Measuring which is better by a statistical breakdown might be good water cooler discussion, but I guess it just doesn’t make me thirsty.

     

  33. b.ski says:

    I will say that the power versus stuff driven great performance is maybe more captivating, but to those that appreciate good pitching, either is brilliant. One fun aspect about watching any well pitched game is the mixing of pitches, in location and type, but Mariano throws 1 pitch, and that’s as fun to watch.  To me, one is as good as the other.
     
     
     
     
    Again, exactly my point.  I am not trying to say that one is better than the other, rather that one (efficiency) is as good as the other (strikeouts).  The way that Game Score is calculated does not reflect this, which is what got me started on the whole thing in the first place.
     
     
     
    I completely agree that it is certainly not worth opening up a federal investigation into the matter, and that was not at all my intent.  Just meant to point out what I perceive to be a shortcoming in the accounting and wondering if anyone else sees it that way too. :-)

  34. b.ski says:

    Dave Cameron is telling the Reds to stick with the same strategy he provided for them prior to game 1.
     
     
     
    And so, just like with game one, I’d argue that the Reds best chances of winning tonight involve pulling Arroyo early. You’re tempting fate every time you ask him to get the Rollins-Victorino-Utley-Howard group out more than once. With Aroldis Chapman fresh and the day off tomorrow, I think the Reds should empty their bullpen tonight, regardless of what the score is early. Arroyo gets the first 11 batters and that’s it. If he gets 11 outs, great. If he only gets five or six, well, you live with it.
    Once Utley comes to the plate a second time, I’d have Chapman on the mound. Yes, Utley is good against left-handed pitchers, but Chapman is not your average LHP, and the odds of him putting one over the wall are substantially higher against Arroyo. You’re going to want Chapman in against Howard and Ibanez anyway, so maximize the batters he faces by bringing him in to face Utley.
    Even though he’s been used in shorter stints out of the bullpen, he’s clearly got the ability to go multiple innings, and I’d try to squeak nine outs out of him if I could. He’s probably the Reds best chance to put zeros on the board, and that’s what they need tonight.
     
     
     
     
    That is because of Arroyo…………
     
     
     
    Vs RHB: 2.37 BB/9, 7.48 K/9, 0.87 HR/9 .278 BABIP, 3.64 FIP, 4.08 xFIP
    Vs LHB: 2.87 BB/9, 4.56 K/9, 1.39 HR/9, .297 BABIP, 5.21 FIP, 4.95 xFIP



    His line against lefties this year was right in line with his career numbers, so he hasn’t gotten any better at getting them out. And, of course, the Phillies line-up is going to be lefty heavy tonight. It’s not a good match-up for the Reds starter.

  35. jkay says:

    for pitchers like Arroyo, you will know the result early on. if he’s gonna get hit, you’ll be able to tell by the 2nd or 3rd inning. he’ll either have trouble getting Phillies out and run up his PC, get tattooed with a big inning or possibly be frustrating the lineup by inducing fly balls and ground-outs.
     
    b.ski: baseball stats have been evolving. rest assured some new stat will be invented to placate your sentiment. it’s only a matter of time. but it will not hold as much weight as you want. for this is America, land of the cowboys. Nobody gets excited by accuracy and efficiency, we want Ks baby!!

  36. b.ski says:

    rest assured some new stat will be invented to placate your sentiment.
     
     
    ……and to save you guys from listening to me prattle on (unless I find something else of course).
     
     
     
     
     
    we want Ks baby!!
     
     
     
    ……and chicks dig the long ball!!
     

  37. b.ski says:

    Just doing a quick check around the websites before the game starts and what do I find?  Joe Posnanski has an article about Game Score and how Lincecum’s score of 96 for his two-hitter is higher than Halladay’s 94 for his no-hitter.  Funny, huh?  Here is some of what he had to say:
     
     
    Game Score is a Bill James invention, a little statistic that gives you a quick and easy, single-number look at how well a pitcher pitched. My sense is that it has always supposed to be little more than a bit of shorthand fun… but I think it has turned out to be one of Bill’s more delightful inventions. The numbers just FEEL right.


    I don’t think Game Scores are supposed to be considered gospel; but they are fun ways to compare some of the great pitched games
     
     
    In Game Score, a 100 is pretty much perfection.

    A 90 or better is pretty close to legendary.



    Lincecum’s 96 Game Score ranks fourth all-time in postseason play. It also scores higher than Halladay’s no-hitter. There will be some people who don’t like the way Game Score weighs strikeouts and walks, who think no-hitters and perfect games should ALWAYS score higher than non-no-hitters and non-perfect-games, and I get that. But there is another side to the issue. There are people who believe that these are the only things a pitcher has any real control over: Strikeouts, walks and home runs allowed. There’s a lot of fascinating statistical evidence on the subject.


    Not that it matters. I don’t know which was the better-pitched game. It’s hard to pick against a no-hitter. But it’s also hard to pick against a 14-strikeout shutout. It’s hard to pick against searing, inevitable dominance. It’s also hard to pick against buoyant, overpowering pitching joy.


    In the end, they were two of the greatest postseason performances ever in the postseason.
     

  38. b.ski says:

    Posnanski also had some nice words about Halladay and his accomplishment:
     
     
     
    Halladay’s no-hitter was so dominating that when he walked Jay Bruce, my only thought was: “Oh, that’s too bad. Now he will only throw a no-hitter instead of a perfect game.” And that was in the fifth inning — two or three innings AFTER I felt sure that the Reds would not get a hit.
    In my lifetime, only Halladay has given me that sense of certainty. Pedro Martinez at his peak is the best pitcher I have ever seen. Greg Maddux at his peak was my favorite pitcher, the closest thing to an artist I ever expect to see on a baseball diamond. Roger Clemens’ dominance, Randy Johnson’s dominance, Dwight Gooden’s dominance in 1984 and ’85, Johan Santana’s dominance in the middle part of this decade, Steve Carlton’s dominance, Tom Seaver’s dominance, Ron Guidry’s dominance… they all had their own special character.
    But only Halladay — for me, anyway — pitches with what I call “retroactivity.” When Halladay is on, like he was against the Reds, it honestly feels like I’m watching him on replay, in a Ken Burns documentary, like the thing has already happened and it’s already famous, like the Thrilla in Manilla or the Texas-USC game. I feel like I’m watching it for the fifth or sixth time. It’s a bit like a new song that sounds like you have already heard it a hundred times before.*

    Halladay’s genius against Cincinnati drew a 94 Game Score… same as Larsen’s perfecto. Halladay struck out eight, walked one, broke bats, broke Cincinnati hearts, left them all in a helpless heap and notched the second-highest postseason Game Score of the last 40 years.

  39. Dino says:

    Count me as one who doesn’t like the Game Score for pitchers; last night is an obvious example.  Atlanta hit a lot of good shots against Tim while the Reds hit nothing against Roy

Trackbacks

  1. [...] were many historical aspects to this season (the perfect game, the playoff no-hitter, the K/BB ratio), but the complete body of work made this a very unique season in this era of [...]